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of the united states pacific command. honorable chip gregson, assistant secretary of defense for asian and pacific security affairs, and david shear deputy assistant secretary of state for east asian and pacific affairs, and we welcome you gentlemen to the first hearing before this committee. we're sort of pleased that you could join us today and testify on recent security developments, involving the country of china. also, wish to welcome admiral willard's wife, donna, who is seeded behind the good admiral. and we welcome you. is the admiral missteps of that, why, you just whisper in his hair and you help them out. welcome. this is a very important and very timely hearing. it's interesting to note that just this morning, press reports indicate that google is contemplating pulling out of china, which we may discuss a bit in our hearing. now stress for some time the critical significance of developments in china to our national security. in recent years while we have been focused on events in the middle east, and south asia, china's influence has grown in asia as well as beyond. i'm ple
of the united states military is we grow and develop people. i mean i've had dozens of these interviews with people, okay, you're getting a few job. this is turning over a new leaf. this is a time to go get it. we've seen people turn their lives around. this is one of the great things about our institution. so clearly these are issues that the policymakers have to come to grips with. our task was put the spotlight on policies, weaknesses, gaps, that's what we have tried to do. i do believe there may be places where barriers should be retained in some way. >> and maybe for some. >> for some purpose. >> maybe promotions or -- >> exactly. >> whether it's a security issue. >> exactly. but what i'm suggesting is that people who are responsible for these policy decisions know what the vital dots look like. they know where they come from. as i -- the report said and in my earlier testimony, the time has passed for us to be having the turf wars on who owns the information. >> i couldn't agree with you more. this is a major challenge for all of us in the senate and house and committee and being
not demonstrated this capability. as the president of the united states noted in his state of the union address last night, the bank bailout was about as popular as a route canal. -- as a root canal. well, it appears that chairman bernanke will be reconfirmed, but i want to express with my vote that the leaders of president president obama's economic team must pivot from the necessary rescue of our major financial institutions to equally if not more necessary help to america's families. in prioritizing the recovery of wall street, leaders at the fed and the treasury, i believe, made significant errors in several key areas. failing to establish a due process mechanism to legally make adjustments to wall street pay, bonuses, and counterparty liabilities so they all had to be paid 100 cents on the dollar. hoarding the tarp reserve for banks long after banks were secure when families were desperate for help, but no, they clung to that reserve just in case the banks needed it. never mind the present need of american families. third, allowing the banks to prevent families in this chamber fighting aga
and united states are going to continue to cooperate so as to be more effective in preventing radical islamic terrorism and prosecuting it when it arises. we shared information with secretary napolitano. and in due course, people spoke and your contributed to that debate. we also came up with an joint statement. it's a eu-u.s. statement. it's an important resolution. it's based on aviation security in particular. and you'll get that text at the end of this press conference. we mention a number of points that are dear to us all. we're talking here about the risk of terrorists, basically the same risk on both sides of the -- i think we want to protect our principals and values. our way of life. and those attacks of course by terrorism. we also share -- say that we share responsibility for fighting terrorism to ensure safety and security for our citizens. i think we all share many of these international values. we talk about a number of objectives and measures. objectives have a lot to do with aviation security. if we've learned anything from the spoiled attack over detroit is that flighted stil
the united states and china's security relationship and encouraged by the joint statement that raumted from the president's recent visit to china. i welcome the administration's efforts to increase u.s. and china relations and cooperation in areas of common interests ranging from counterterrorism and nonproliferation to energy security. we must work together with china for the settlement of conflicts and reduction of retentions that contribute to global and regional instact including denuclearization of korean peninsula and the situation in south asia. i particular welcome the administration's support for increasing military to military contacts i've long viewed contacts is essential. it builds trust, promotes understanding, prevents conflicts and it fosters cooperation, and given my own visits to china in recent years i know how important these relationships are. looking back at u.s./china security cooperation under the previous administration, there are positive steps, but there's still much progress to be reeved. in the new administration will continue to face many challenges and i remai
do nothing, that health care costs will continue to strangle small businesses in the united states, will continue to further increase their grip around the throats of families in the united states and all we hear when we go back to our districts is about the cost of health care. and this is president obama's attempt and the attempt of the democrats to try to fix this problem. by doing absolutely nothing we're going to see an $1,800 a year increase in the average family of four's health care costs next year. and then another $1,800 the following year and another $2,000 and it will just keep escalating to the point where it eats up the whole family budget and you're paying more and getting less in coverage, really. so it's eating up the whole family budget, less money to spend on tuition, less money to go on a vacation, less money to increase your family's quality of life. maybe move into a better neighborhood, a better school district. and all of these things are not available to families because of the increased cost in health care. and so doing nothing allows that to continue beca
states became a global power and i'm thinking back to the monroe doctrine about the united states and our sphere of influence, you are asking about strategic interest in rebuilding haiti. i do think that there is interest on the part of the united states strategically to engage haiti and make sure that this epic human catastrophe resolves itself, and this is going to take a very long time, but look, the united states was the first one to announce humanitarian help. we're always the biggest contributor when natural disasters happen in the world. no other country on the face of the earth in the history of the world does more to help people in situations like this than the united states of america. we always deliver. the question is, how best to do this? and when you look back since 1992, since the clintons were in office, what you've seen is a dedication of $3 billion from the united states going into haiti. it is still incredibly poor despite all of this effort on the part of the united states and other nations. in fact, haiti has the greatest number of nongovernmental organizations, ngos,
? to the united states or places beyond. yet the u.s. is saying, don't even think about. we will repatriate you, we will deter you. that's correct, right? >> well, i think the united states is saying that we want people to stay here and help rebuild haiti. those who have -- who want to go to the united states, who want to go legally, obviously, we don't have any problem with that. >> what if they turn up illegally? what if they get across throughout desperation? is there a humane process to deal with them, or will they just be locked up? >> i've gone to the radio many times and explained to the hatian people, they should stay here, there'll be a lot of money here, a lot of opportunities here, and when the time comes to rebuild this country, the united states will repatriate people on the high seas, because it's a dangerous voyage, because we know many thousands of people have lost their lives over the years attempting that. and that's not something we think people should statement. there's a legal way to seek immigration to the united states and we're going to encourage people to pursue those a
you have to speak to it? >> oh, sure, yes, i do. gularly. here in the united states, in europe and in the middle east. that assertion is based on the assumption that the united states cannot at the same time be totally committed to israel's security-- which we are-- and be totally committed to the creation of the palestinian state-- which we are. and i believe that those are not mutually exclusive. to the contrary, that i believe they are mutually reinforcing. it will help israel get security for its people if the palestinians have a state and this issue is over. >> rose: george mitchell for the hour. next. if you've had a coke in the last 20 years, ( screams ) you've had a hand in giving college scholarships... and support to thousands of our nation's... most promising students. ♪ ( coca-cola 5-note mnemonic ) captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george mitchell is here. he is president obama's special envoy to the middle east, the former maine senator and majority leader has a proven record of brokerin
, the largest loss of life in the history of the united nations on a single day. the united states has been there from the beginning, and the military has been great, the response by the state department and aid has been great. i just can't say enough about it, and the people in haiti know it, and i'm grateful. secondly, i'd like to thank president bush for agreeing to do this and for the concern he showed for haiti. you know, before this happened, my foundation worked with the pepfar people on the aids problems in haiti and i saw how great they were and what they did and how many lives they saved. finally, let me say that i don't have to read the website because they did, but i want to say something about this. right now, all we need to do is get food and medicine and water and a secure place for them to be, but when we start the rebuilding effort, we want to do what i did with the president's father in the tsunami area. we want to be a place where people can know their money will be well spent, where we will ensure the ongoing integrity of the process. and we want to stay with this over t
barack obama, the u.s. president, that there will be further attacks on the united states unless he takes steps to resolve the palestinian situation. in an audiotape obtained by al- jazeera on sunday, the al qaeda chief, praised the nigerian accused of the christmas day bombing." we would give a listen to a translation of that tape. -- we will get a listen to a translation of that tape. >> made peace beyond those that osama bin laden brings guidance to. our message, carried by words, conveyed to you through the flame of the hero, we have proved that the heroes of 9/11 can be effective. the message is that america will never dream of living in peace unless we lived it in palestine. it is not fear -- it is not fair that you enjoy a safe life while our brothers in gaza suffered greatly. with god's will, we will continue as long as you continue to support israel. peace be on those that follow the lead of guidance. host: that tape was released yesterday. first, a quick political note, marion barry is set to announce his retirement after seven terms, according to two sources. the move would mak
presidents of the united states, bill clinton and george w. bush. we've watched the sunday shows so you don't have to. we'll break it all down with james carvel and mary madeline and the best political team on television. "state of the union" sound of sunday for january 17th. president obama's point man for the humanitarian crisis acknowledges complaints from search and rescue teams and medical organizations saying they can't get clooerns to fly in. dr. rah jooef shaw says balancing the need for boots on the ground with the dire shortage of food, water and medicine. >> we have 30 teams from around the world on the ground, approximately 30 teams. each of those teams is 70-plus individuals. they have dogs and assets and specialized equipment. they work around the clock. our teams from the u.s. were the first teams to get in. they set aup center that allowed the others to know where to go and work in a more coordinated way. you always want more and we have sa number of teechls on standby in the united states. we were told by the haitian government that we need to balance the degree of that ver
barrier, for these issues. in the united states we have the high-paying jobs here in the united states. host: how can this be done? caller: i am not certain about how you can do this. it seems that corporate america would rather pay the lower costs, then keeping the labor here in the united states. the government may be able to find a way to keep these jobs here in the united states. host: thank you very much. the "richmond times dispatch." they have a report on the comeback of the stock market, and how the seemed unimaginable. that is one take on the economy. baltimore, you are up right now. how are you doing? caller: i would say the number one policy issue for me is afghanistan. and there is the economy and jobs. i have done quite a bit of reading. this is reminding me of vietnam. i think that this is taking so many resources from the country and it will be hard to address any other problem. we are approaching this in the middle east, and this is not helping to solve the problems over there. more money should be devoted to domestic problems. i would like to see a lot done with public
starts now. >>> we're supposed to be seeing new procedures for folks flying to the united states. but are airports following the rules? tonight checking on your security situation. and why your treatment will depend not only on where you're from, but where you've been. but following a green beret as he goes off to war. >> i feel more nervous more for her and the kids. >> tonight one man's mission and the impact on those left behind. and a tremendous accomplishment. teams finally unveil the tallest structure that man has ever created. today a deadly shootout inside a federal building in las vegas. investigators say a man wearing black walked into the lobby of a federal courthouse, pulled out a shotgun from his jacket and opened fire. all of the video from that incident in just a moment. seven u.s. marshalls and security officers later responded with a hail of bullets. one court officer is dead tonight. a deputy u.s. marshal is in the hospital tonight and the gunman was shot and killed. so why did he do it? now we've learned he was upset because he lost a lawsuit. more on the motiv
at those the washington post. calling for allowing haitians in the united states who are here illegally to find work. "the new york times" echoing "the washington post." the first phone call comes from chris on independent mine in ohio. good morning. caller: the morning. everybody keeps getting -- host: go ahead, we can hear you. caller: pat robertson was right. it did -- they did sell their souls to the devil. not that we should not help -- we should help. they went with the french -- now they're asking americans to save us. host: what part of history are you saying? caller: pat roberts and back -- said back in 1761, i think, that they chose to sell their souls to the devils -- the french, communist, but they are begging us to help. we cannot even support ourselves. we are getting ripped off by our own government. how can we support them, too? i don't understand -- we are starving to death and, yes, i understand it was a natural disaster but it was not our fault and that understand we should help, there is no problem with that, but why is it we are starving to death, too. host: what ab
the ambassador from haiti to the united states, that more than 100,000 are feared dead or missing as a result of this earthquake that rocked haiti almost 24 hours ago. more than 100,000 people. we heard the same thing from the prime minister of haiti just a few hours ago. susan candiotti is now on the scene for us. just a little while ago filed this report. >> reporter: over my shoulder you will see some of the thousands of homes that are built into the side of the mountains here. these ones you see over my shoulder incredibly were not impacted by the earthquake, but as we flew from the dominican republic into port-au-prince, we began to see right away some of the devastation caused by this earthquake. we saw, for one thing, a lot of homes that were employeded, looked as though they had been imploded. then when we finally set down or helicopter at the airport here, we saw cracks in the airport, we saw people teeming outside, lined up, but patiently, without causing problem, waiting to see if they could get a commercial flight out. there was no way that was going to happen, but the real impact
first bill signing as president of the united states, president obama was upholding justice ginsburg's interpretation of the law in the dissent she filed in the 2007 decision. [applause] she once noted that dissents speak to a future age, the greatest dissents do become the dominant view. so that's the dissenter's hope, she said. they are writing not for today, but for tomorrow. and that is exactly what happened in this case. i was serving as the chief of staff to the first lady in the clinton administration when president clinton announced the nomination of justice ginsburg as only the second woman to the highest court. he said at the time that she was brilliant, had a compelling life story whose record was interesting. she was independent, progressive, but we were cheering because she was a champion for women's rights. the justice and i share a very, very dear friend. national public radio's legal correspondent for the supreme court, nina totenberg. nina reminded me that justice ginsburg began her crusade for gender equality in partnership with her husband marty, with whom she shar
blames the united states and israel for the assassination of one of its nuclear scientists. the bomb attack now ratcheting up tensions and iran's nuclear standoff with the west. i'm wolf blitzer in cnn's command center, for breaking news, politics and extraordinary reports from around the world. you're in "the situation room." >>> all that coming up, but this just coming into "the situation room." a new breach of airline security, this time it's a potential health threat, not a terror threat. u.s. airways now confirms a person on the cdc's do not board list flew from philadelphia to san francisco on saturday. let's go to our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen. what happened here? >> someone somewhere along the way dropped the ball. the way it words is the centers for disease control has a list of people who they think are basically a threat to public health, shouldn't be on a plane. this person was apparently on that list, the cdc gives the list to the tsa. the tsa is supposed to give that list to individual airlines, but something went wrong here. i find this next part a b
of drugs, the purchasing of drugs in the united states and western europe. until we deal with the current until we deal with the current -- the issue of consumption, we h supply. many believe that mexico is fighting the u.s. problem. drugs are still reaching the u.s. market. guest: if we don't participate, it creates a griddle next national security issue? guest: we need to participate but there are many things united states could do like to deal with the flow of arms out of most mexicans are being killed by weapons exporter from the united states. where is all the money going? why can we open a bank accounts and find out where the money from this terrible curse is actually going? host: is it your view that drug consumption has bite in the last few years? guest: very much so. we have a much wider variety of stuff that people can buy, unfortunately. host: first up is syracuse on and democrats . caller: 01 to ask about haiti and the bill clinton policy and that record -- i wanted to ask about haiti and the bill clinton policy in that regard. there's an issue about the phone company privatiz
. one of the findings of the 9/11 commission was the ultimate threat to the united states was when the worst weapons fell into the hands of the worst people. that led congress to create our commission to evaluate what is our level of preparation to avoid the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, particularly into the hands of terrorists. so it was appropriate that we started the day by giving back to the beginnings of this effort with families 9/11. our report on today comes eight years after 9/11. it comes one year after the publication of the report which was entitled world at risk, purposefully titled to indicate this is not one nation's problem, this is a global problem because it is the earth which is at risk, and one month after the failed attempt at an aviation bombing on christmas day there is some good news. the good news is particularly in the area of nuclear terrorism that the trend lines here seem to be running in the right direction. president obama has taken major steps to revitalize the non-proliferation regime and to encourage needed international cooperatio
in the history of the united states in the last administration after we got hit on 9/11, we had to form the department of homeland security because all of these agencies -- the cia, the fbi, the national security agency, local law enforcement, nobody could talk to one another. so here we are. did that work? did that really work or was this just the due diligence of american bureaucracy just not working? what happened here? oh, but we got to pin it on obama. we can't wait to pin it on him because he's weak on terror. you know, when this is all washed out, we are going to find out -- and we'll dig out the sound bites because they're in the archive. i remember joe lieberman, oh, we just have to have the rearrangement of government so we can protect america. i remember all that. i remember dick cheney coming out and saying that we have to do this because we're going to get hit again, that we just -- well, can we just say this? we kind of got lucky on christmas day, that there were some people that got after it and it was a failed attempt? but we knew about the red flags, we had the intel, i
the politics of this in the united states are going to force this administration to draw down substantially before 2012. one thing i think is certain, we certainly will not have achieved lasting security change, if that's the case. what i do think is this, i think that by mid 2011, we will have a pretty good idea whether or not this strategy, the mcchrystal strategy, the obama strategy, has a chance of succeeding. if by the middle of 2011, which will be 12 months after we've gotten all of the forces or at least most of the forces in the theater, we've ramped up civilian advisers to around 1,000 or so at beginning of 2009 we've begun working regional diplomacy. if by mid 2011 we don't see any sign of change, then we've learned something. the patient was dead. president obama inherited a dead patient on the table. and we cannot rebuild the avenue -- afghan state. if that's the case, we're in a difficult situation. there's no simple, let's say let's all come home. pretend it's not a problem. more will probably not be the answer. staying on indefinitely will not be the answer. and quitting will
bork for the supreme court of the united states, and september 17 when i traveled to philadelphia with the president, it was a thursday and i missed my opportunity to question judge bork. and i got that opportunity on saturday morning, and i was the only one there and had -- at least there were only a few people there and had an opportunity to question judge bork for an hour and a half. and ultimately, played a key role in the rejection of the nomination of judge bork who believed in original intent and had a very, very different view of the constitution. did not believe in due process of law. that was not part of the constitution, and he disagreed with the incorporation of the ten amendments through the due process clause to apply to the states. and that was a momentous supreme court hearing. during the years of president george h.w. bush, there were many matters of note. one that stands out was the confirmation proceeding as to justice souter, and when justice souter was up for confirmation and i participated in that as a member of the judiciary committee as i have participated
started in earnest in the late 1940's, we became very much a war that in the 1950's the united states of the soviet union were locked in to an existential crisis. it was a sort of stable crisis over the years, but a crisis nonetheless. we chatted a enormous nuclear power. we each have the ability to destroy the other country. and tonight, destroying most of the world. so we produced what was called a balance of terror, were both leaders on both sides, whenever there was a real crisis did not ever want to be pushed to a point of having to use nuclear weapons. and that governs the way we thought about our policy in almost every part of the world. now as a reporter in that environment, and as they moscow correspondent, and i remember i was the moscow correspondent during some of the most acute berlin crises, during the cuban missile crisis, and a number of others as well in the middle east. i believe now that i thought then that in pursuing my story, i wanted us to win. i didn't want the soviet union to gain and manage over the united states. i don't know that i literally wrote stories i
on the ground. haiti's ambassador to the united states visited a relief hearing in washington today and passed on a request. send body bags. >> body bags because the way they are disposing of some of the corpses is very undigfy anied. >> shepard: witnesses tell of make shift graves popping up all over the capital and they are not being documented and therefore their friends and family members no one will know exactly who died, where or weather. survivors struggle to bury the dead. medical teams and relief workers fighting to keep the living alive. steve harrigan live in port-au-prince this evening. earlier today you said you are starting to see more hopeful signs. >> certainly, shep, we have seen a bigger international presence on o the streets and u.n. convoys and international red cross but really tough going for the people especially here in port-au-prince. when you knock down all the buildings you have to do everything in the street and for many the street has become the kitchen, the living room, the bathroom and for some even the cemetery. we are seeing people leave the city in hope of mo
to help haiti address its own problems. many haitian americans living in the united states have technical expertise in areas such as agriculture, education, health care and infrastructure and would like to return to haiti to assist their people. my bill creates a mechanism to transfer this knowledge in order to meet the needs and the goals of haiti. beyond that we need to ensure that we find other innovative ways to build human capacity, such through education alex changes, programs like i have proposed and other members, the chirly chisholm act, now more than ever, haiti needs the support of its neighbor to the north. even as we deal with our own problems during these tough economic times, we must not turn a blind eye to the untold human suffering just off our shores. today we express our continued support for haiti, we stand in solidarity with the haitians and the haitian americans who have lost loved ones, with the united states citizens still trapped on the island. we stand in solidarity with the rescue workers who have devoted their time and their treasure to help people they do not
that a nigerian was being prepared for attacks in the united states on the homeland. my understanding is the least one of those intersects i think there were several specifically mentioned umar farouk abdulmutallab, the first two names. if you put it together with the fact this suspect's own father and not just anyone off the street as it has been stated by some in the intelligence community but a respected nigerian banker went physically to the embassy and talked to not one agency but to, the department and central intelligence agency and wasn't in missing person report. he said he was conservative his son, he's in yemen, and the nsa intercepted background. follow those meetings with written communications and telephone calls. we know that yemen is a hotbed of terrorism. apparently intelligence community didn't receive a possibility al qaeda and the arab peninsula might attack the homeland which is the story is another failure of imagination and it seems al qaeda is fixation on aviation system all of it seems to me not just in retrospect but before the effect of to have been enough to put on high
clinton, the president of the united states from 1993 to 2001, and i will never forget, on the education of our 30th -- 30th anniversary, the very difficult situation where you joined us and where you made such a great speech. since that time, you have been with us, i think, every single year. and we are so glad to welcome you back, and particularly at this very special occasion. [applause] i think what people appreciate most is your sense of passion and the deep sense of humanity which you show always as an individual. it is not so much your formal work as a president which impresses everybody, but it is in addition -- you as a human being, which is such a great characteristic of yours. bill, you have a relationship with the country that dates back several decades. even you had your honeymoon in haiti. and since that time, i know that you had to spend a lot of your attention, of your time in your presidency but also after words with the clinton initiative in giving special attention to haiti. your knowledge of the country, its people, and its challenges has also been the reason why in m
on iran might precipitate a wider third war for the united states in the greater middle eastnd we couldn't afford that. we thought the smartest strategy was to build up sanctions, sport for sanctions against iran and we'll see that, i think, play out in real life over the next couple of months. we wanted to shine a bright light and a stronger light on the human-rights abuses of the iranian government. we wanted to draw a military cordon around iran to contain it and the united states, i think, is in a good position to do that. and we wanted to play for the long-term because we wanted... we didn't want to do anything that would movement in iran and we thought the early use of force might effectively kill that opposition movement. and so in playing for the long term, we assume that there is some kind of solution here short of the use of u.s. military force. that is the hand we played that happens to be my own view as well. >> rose: all right. let me go to gary, the iranian hand. which has been influenced, obviously, by the political turmoil after the election. was that factored in or did t
resistence did you run into trying to accomplish it? >> well, charlie, we felt that the united states was actually in better shape now than it was a year ago. president obama, we felt, had done more to advance the agenda because he has essentially put the iranians on the defenve. and the iranians are more isolated now than they were when president obama was negotiating. so we were playing for the long term in the simulated game. the american team that i lead was trying to position all of our friends and partners to put greater pressure on the iranians. we wanted very much to avoid an early israeli use of force because while we are very sympathetic, of course, to the israeli predictment, we felt that an israeli attack on iran might precipitate a wider third war for the united states in the greater middle east and we couldn't afford that. we thought the smartest strategy was to build up sanctions, sport for sanctions against iran and we'll see that, i think, play out in real life over the next couple of months. we wanted to shine a bright light and a stronger light on the human-rights a
you are president of the united states. that doesn't work when you come into washington d.c. and you have people like nancy pelosi and harry reid and politicians on the hill that will call your-- claw your eyes out if you stand still. he has not asserted himself. he has not been the barack obama of iowa. i keep waiting for the barack obama of iowa. >> rose: what was the barack obama of iowa reasons barack obama of iowa was a guy that reached out to republicans and to independents who would come in to me, when we were going around iowa doing our show there during the caucus saying you know what, this guy isn't wedded to all of those fights and those ideaological battles that bill clinton and hillary clinton and george w. bush fought from 1968 on. he's going to take us forward. the problem is he has turned his presidency over, over the past year, to people whose political careers were framed that way. i think he's going to have to stop being the law professor, start being the leader. i think he's going to start being more lbj. >> rose: back to you for health care, adam. is health-care
to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, january 21, 2010. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable kirsten gillibrand, a senator from the state of new york, to perform te duties of the chair. signed: robert c. byrd, presidet pro tempore. mr. mcconnell: madam president? the presiding officer: the republican leader. mr. mcconnell: i want to thank the majority leader for giving me the chance to make my very brief opening remarks as i must leave the building shortly. i thank him. mr. president, the senate's newest member is coming down from massachusetts today and we'll have a chance to welcome senator-elect brown to the capitol. obviously, we're delighted to have him. senator-elect brown has captured the attention of the entire country, but he has captured the attention of massachusetts voters
relations with the united states in 1995. hen knoy's overwhelming goal was to win favorable trade deals with the united states and admission to globaled bodies like the world trade organization, bringing up unpleasant subjects like agent orange, worked against that strategy. but having detained these schools, hanoi has begun to press its demands and is demanding compensation for the suffering of its people and that has put the united states in a tough spot. not wanting to set a precedent but on the other hand recognizing vietnam is an increasingly vital military security allies and trading partner. it also raises a larger issue of what responsibility to the u.s. military has to clean up the environmental messes after the war a run. meanwhile another hidden problem with agent orange is impacting our veterans. with each passing year medical researchers are discovering many illnesses many of them major chronic diseases like parkinson's for which exposure to the agent orange turns out to be a risk factor. hundreds of thousands have been denied va care for years and is said they avoided for
of the united states. this same strategy of dividing the opposition has actually worked before to win counterinsurgency campaigns. there have been very few counterinsurgency campaigns that have been successful in the 20th century, but the defeat of the philippine rebels after the spanish-american war at the turn of the last century, the u.s. backed greek governments defeat of the guerrillas in 1947, and the british defeated the chinese insurgency in the 1950s, all of those have the same thing in common, that they split the opposition. however, in iraq the ethnosectarian fishers are still great. and i don't think the show is over yet. in my book, "partitioning for peace," which is on, what to do about iraq, i go through so the other ethnocentric conflict in world history and find a violent sometimes as the usually always returns unless the underlying issues have been resolved, which they have in iraq. they don't have an oil law which is their bread and butter commodity so you can see the level of disagreement in society. and of course, they have struggled even to get a date for the ele
the united states and japan, between the foreign minister and secretary clinton. they're really starting to cement their relationship. i can sense the chemistry and the trust developing between the two. that's deeply gratifying. in addition, the secretary gave a speech really outlining -- to interact with asia when it comes to its fledgling international organizations. and so even though the trip was abriefiated, i think we got quite a bit of work done. as p.g.a. indicated, this is today we're marking the 50th anniversary of the u.s.-japan security alliance, the security partnership. it's no exaggeration to say that it has been the cornerstone and the foundation of everything that we've managed to accomplish over the course of the last few generations inin asia. and we hear this not just from japanese friends but throughout the region. over the course of the last couple of months, as the united states and japan worked together on a series of challenging matters, one of the things that's been most interesting and gratifying is how much we hear from other countries in the region, from sout
into this al qaeda narrative that says that islam -- the united states is at war with islam. we have to be very careful. it's that narrative that feeds the ranks and builds the ranks of al qaeda. >> reporter: this afternoon, the council on american/islamic relations said the new guidelines amount to racial profiling, though the tsa says the majority of all travelers come to the u.s. will get enhanced screening, not just those from the 14 countries named. wolf? >> do you get the sense this is just the latest step that more are on the way? >> this is definitely an evolutionary process. they want to take some steps immediately. there will be reevaluations, new intelligence that come in, and things will change, i'm sure. >> thank you, jeanne. >>> let's get to the white house where the terror threat is the president's most urgent priority. he's back from vacation. our dan lothian is standing by. dan, the president is getting some high-level briefings today, getting ready for a full-scale meeting with his top advisers tomorrow? >> reporter: he is, wolf. first of all, the president getting an update f
the mood here -- enormous am of enemies. you see a -- the united states remains slowly crawling out a recession. there is a sense we are saddled with debt. are we witnessing some kind of power transition? >> you know, i think phrasing it in terms of a power transition, fareed, makes what's always a mistake in the economic area. which is to think in terms of zero subgames. we are witnessing an incredible and profound change in china and india and in many other emerging countries. we are seeing living standards grow from more people, more quickly, than at any point in global history. that is a hugely positive thing and it is a very fundamental thing. but that success is not if we pursue the right policies a threat to the united states. it is an enormous opportunity, it is more potential for us to grow our capacity, export than there ever has been before. that's why the president set a goal of doubling our exports over the next five years in the state of the union it created 2 million jobs. and in the process. it is more potential for the united states to benefit from lower priced prod
to be a sustained policy after the first action, does the united states then support future actions or does it say never again, that this cannot occur again? all the while dealing with the aftermath of then is really strike and the implications that entail. finally, if this does not come to pass, and iran, diplomacy does not work in israel does not strike then we are going to be focusing a large part of the coming year and afterwards on confidence-building and reassurance among our allies as we try to build a containment regime to deal with nuclear iran. i would raise the question one of the main challenges we will face in confidence building is how to convince the allies that a country that was unable to prevent iran from achieving the outcome we defined as unacceptable, that is acquiring nuclear weapons, will also be able to have the willpower and resolve to deter nuclear iran and we will face challenges in our theater engagement strategy and trying to build a containment architecture to do with nuclear iran if that comes to pass. just a couple of quick comments about the whole issue of strategi
students from all over the united states. i've been associated with this program as faculty director for about 10 years. and this is a program which is very dear to my heart. and we have consistently had some of the best, most authoritative speakers available. and cerda, this is true of juan zarate. there is a scene in the 1975 movie about the watergate invasion, all the presidents men. and there's a meeting in an underground washington garage and watch how holbrook, playing an informant known by the name of deep throat, tells robert redford playing bob warburg, the "washington post" reporter, that if he wants to find out who is responsible for the water great burglary, at democratic party headquarters, at the watergate, you should follow the money. well, we have some here today who has followed money. in his capacity as deputy assistant secretary of the treasury. and this was a job that really involves one of the most complex tasks in the antiterrorism effort. that have these people get their money, how they spend their money, and it takes a person with uncommon diligence and uncomm
. the murder rate in the united states in 1991 was -- there were 24,000 murders. the population is roughly two of its 60 million. last year in afghanistan, 2000 afghans died in the violence but the population of afghanistan was roughly 30 million. do the math. . . why did the afghans -- what is your view of the future? when americans ask this question, i am surprised only 17% said that. if u.s. afghans the same question, 40% had the view. but as a surprising answer, given that we're the most corrupt country in the world, but the reason afghans have this answer is because this looks like what we have lived through. each one of these would be devastating to a country, so even though we know all the problems, what is going on is better than the last -- then the past. almost none of the refugees have returned. refugees did not return to a place they do not think they have a future, and afghans do not think they have a future. many people, including girls, when asked if they have more freedom, 75% said yes. let's say we solve afghanistan given what i have said, there is still a problem with pakista
mcdonnell, do solomnly swear, that i will support the constitution of the united states, and the constitution of the commonwealth of virginia, and that i will faithfully and impartially discharge the duties incumbent up on me as governor of the commonwealth of virginia, according to the best of my ability, so help me god. [ cheers and applause ] [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] [applause] >> members and guests, please be seated. i have the honor to present to the sovereign people of virginia the new governor of the commonwealth, his excellencey, robert francis mcdonnell. [cheers and applause] >> well, that is a lot of people there. kind of like one of your fundraisers. thank you. thank you. [cheers and applause] >> thank you! [cheers and applause] >> thank you! thank you so much for the incredible honor that you bestowed on me. thank you, mr. speaker, lieutenant governor bowling, attorney general, members of the general assembly, distinguished guests from around the world and across the country, family and friends, fellow virginians and americans. g
discrimination. now it is noteworthy that in his first bill signing as president of the united states, president obama was upholding justice ginsburg's interpretation of the law in the dissent she filed in the 2007 decision. [applause] she once noted that dissents speak to a future age, the greatest dissents do become the dominant view. so that's the dissenter's hope, she said. they are writing not for today, but for tomorrow. and that is exactly what happened in this case. i was serving as the chief of staff to the first lady in the clinton administration when president clinton announced the nomination of justice ginsburg as only the second woman to the highest court. he said at the time that she was brilliant, had a compelling life story whose record was interesting. she was independent, progressive, but we were cheering because she was a champion for women's rights. the justice and i share a very, very dear friend. national public radio's legal correspondent for the supreme court, nina totenberg. nina reminded me that justice ginsburg began her crusade for gender equality in partnership with
-terror strategy. am i wrong? >> i think it's deeper than that. the united states has a problem. if this was a political matter, then you could have one level of concern. but the fact is that we are in a war, our enemies are clever enough to take haggai nearian, train him in yemen, ship him through amsterdam. our bureaucracy is so lacking in focus that even when this guy's father called the american embassy and warned us specifically about his son, we couldn't find a way to stop him and frankly issue the white house advisor yesterday made no sense when he said there was no smoking gun. we don't have to approve the visa or the flight of every foreigner who wants to come here. the burden of proof ought to be on that person. if somebody's father calls and says, my son has gone radical. i think he may be in a training camp. i think that ought to be a high hurdle for that person to get a visa to the united states or be allowed to fly into this country. >> you know the bureaucracy is always going to screw up. it's just never going to be entirely perfect. and this flight emanating in t
just returned from yemen. you had talks with the president of yemen. is the united states going to have direct involvement there, in other words, troops on the ground or launching strikes from inside yemen? >> well, in fact, you taukd to the yemeni foreign minister, as well, and he was quite clear that yemen does not want to have american ground troops there and that's a good, good response for us to hear, certainly. >> wonderful ground troops there. >> no, of course, we would always want a host nation to deal with a problem itself. we want to help, we're providing assistance so we're going to provide more assistance in the course of this year than we did last year and after i think having zeerode it out back, if you recall, '08. this is an effort that we want to help them to deal with a problem that threatens their very rid of government and their very existence as you know it. >> you talk about providing more aid. from what i can gather, aide w increased by $2 trillion in 2008 and 2010. you said when you were there it was going to double this year or next year. is that going to happe
. >>> the president of the united states getting ready to address the nation from the white house. as soon as he goes to the microphone, you'll hear what he has to say on the failed terror attack in detroit, outside detroit on christmas day. we'll go there live, you'll hear everything. in the meantime, let's check in with jack cafferty. he has today's "cafferty file." >> some say it's past time to begin profiling passengers. the u.s. is demanding better koreaning from places like iran, pakistan, saudi arabia, yemen, the usual suspects. the screening is to include things like full body scans, patdowns, searches of carry-on bags, and explosive detection technology. from the school of common sense comes the idea it makes sense to more thoroughly screen passengers who come from cunning where they may have been exposed to radical islamic teaching, but improved technology isn't the answer. the head of security for el al, says we need better questioning of passengers. he suggests hiring well-educated, highly trained agents, who know what to look for. he says profiling isn't about single out certain ethnic g
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